Category Archives: new careers

For-Profit Colleges Mislead Students


SPECIAL OFFER AT BOTTOM OF ARTICLE
On May 4, 2010, we posted an article on this blog and at the home page of Career Coaching for Students™ entitled PBS Frontline Exposes Fraud at For-Profit Schools. Obviously we have to give PBS credit for the story. Now it seems the General Accounting Office (GAO, United States Agency) has published their findings which are both confirming the PBS story and very damning for the “For-Profit Educational Industry”. These “for profits” offer “extensive career planning and placement programs” which has been the enabler for the “for-profit college industry” to secure significant market share in the higher education industry.

According to the United States Government Accountability Office (GAO), nearly two million students attend for-profit colleges, pursuing bachelor’s and associate’s degrees in disciplines that range from cosmetology to nursing and engineering. In 2009, for-profit colleges received more than $20 billion in federal loans and grants. These are powerful institutions that students, the government, and employers have trusted with a significant part of our society’s future. Knowing this information, you can imagine the outrage and shock that accompanied today’s GAO report that implicated 15 for-profit colleges in deceptive recruiting & career planning practices.

Of the 15 colleges tested, four institutions were guilty of fraud in their aggressive and misleading marketing techniques. As part of the GAO’s undercover investigation, four agents posed as prospective students and met with admissions staff for financial aid, tuition, and career planning information. The test revealed the following questionable marketing practices:

  • One for-profit college encouraged an applicant to hide $250,000 worth of assets on a federal financial aid application
  • According to The New York Times, another college encouraged a student to lie about dependents on a financial aid application 
  • Admissions representatives misrepresented tuition costs, quoting the price of classes for nine months instead of one full year
  • Students were provided with false career planning advice. For example, one program mentioned that barbers could earn up to $250,000 annually. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 90 percent of barbers earn $43,000 per year.
  • One admissions representative undermined the financial burden of student loans, implying that defaulters cannot be held accountable for missed payments
  • Admissions representatives engaged in aggressive marketing strategies, pressuring the undercover agents to sign contracts even if they weren’t ready to make a decision.

Although the names of the 15 for-profit colleges remain confidential, the surveyed programs were in a number of disciplines, offering both associate’s and bachelor’s degrees in subjects ranging from business to cosmetology. This information coincides with an education record.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 70 percent of high school graduates from the class of 2009 were enrolled in a two-year or four-year program when surveyed in October ’09 — the highest number in United States history. While this is a figure worth celebrating, it is also indicative of a growing issue – proper career exploration and planning.

How many of these students are making informed career decisions when choosing a program to attend? How many of these students will position themselves to guarantee a return on investment, and how many will drown in debt upon graduation, falling victim to aggressive marketing practices, false career planning advice, and unrealistic expectations about career prospects? Whether or not students have fair access to objective information, they are still responsible for the costs and consequences of their education and career planning strategy.

Of all the concerning questions, how many students, by taking the bait at these fraudulent institutions, are missing out on a career that would have been much more fulfilling and resulted in greater success?

Students have to make adult decisions with real consequences at a very young age. The issue isn’t whether students are mature enough to choose and plan their careers. The issue is around access to solid, credible career coaching for students. As a society, as parents, as teachers, and as students, it is more important than ever that career coaching be provided to all students.

If you’re not investing a substantial sum of money, you are investing a substantial amount of time, so be an educated consumer when shopping for a college. Just as you would compare the economic implications of buying a car, you should compare the economic implications of your degree, college, and program relative to career interests. In addition to looking at rankings, prestige, and marketing materials — regardless of whether you are looking at a nonprofit or for-profit college — weigh the economic and educational return on investment. Our students are our future’s most valuable asset, so let’s position them to be successful.

A GREAT OFFER TO READERS OF THIS BLOG – UNLIMITED ACCESS TO STUDENT RESOURCE CENTRAL™ FOR ONLY $19.95: The Career Coaching for Students™ website has an extensive private area for career and educational research that is normally reserved for our individual and workshop clients. Each resource has been evaluated for its quality, value and ethical representation of information. We call it Student Resources Central™. Due to the new, alarming information about corrupt “for-profit” institutional practices, we are offering the full Student Resources Central site to parents** and students for $19.95 per access license. This is a unique offer and the access has no expiration. If you are a high school administrator or teacher and would like to gain access to the site for all of your students we offer the same price to you also. This one-time purchase provides access with no expiration. To buy an access license go here. Aren’t sure it is worth it? We guarantee your satisfaction* or we’ll give you a full refund and we’ll eat the credit card fees.

*Guarantee will be honored for 30 days. After 30 days we figure you found the site helpful.
**This offer is not available to professionals or organizations that offer career guidance services, tools or products. For more information on becoming a Career Coaching for Students™ Licensed Facilitator which includes full rights to use Student Resource Central  with all of your customers contact Carl Nielson at 972.346.2892 or visit our Coach Facilitator information page on the website.

Insights for Parents: The Pressure of Choosing a Career


As a parent of a college student and a teenager in high school, one of my biggest questions in my mind is “Am I helping my children with the right information and career guidance?”  Am I helping them understand their unique talents, skills, behaviors and motivators and translate these into identifying a career path that is motivating and fulfilling for them?  

I’ve worked with many teenagers, high school and college students for several years and have gained a few insights. As a full time management consultant, executive coach and executive & student career coach and as a parent, I’m sharing “insights” that I hope are useful to parents. The focus of these insights is specific to parents of teenagers (or college students) who are struggling with helping their son or daughter with career guidance.  So instead of this being advice, please consider these, at best, my insights. 

Here are a few points to consider to reduce the pressure of Career Guidance: 

  1. Be a good listener. Listening with open ears and an open mind is one of the most powerful ways you can help your son or daughter. Listening means “not talking, telling or judging”. Listening means asking open ended questions to learn what is in the mind of your son or daughter?
  2. Observe and create an awareness of their talents and skills. Become very observant of your teenagers skills and talents in their day to day activities at home, schools and in social gatherings. Open ended discussion around these observations creates a heightened awareness among the teenager. This new awareness also motivates them to explore and learn more about these talents and skills on their own.
  3. Be understanding. Choosing a career is a process of exploration and takes time and effort. When helping your son or daughter explore their own talents and the potential careers that will be a good fit, don’t push for an immediate decision, it has to evolve over time in the mind of your child. Choosing a career is not a healthy objective in the short term. A better “parental objective” is to support your son or daughter in exploring their interests, attitudes, motivators (self awareness) and the careers, industries, companies and people that might help them “find” their place in the world. Developing a strategy that ensures they are positioned to pursue the best career for them is an admiral goal and a less frustrating proposition for you and your child.
  4. Approach career exploration as a fun journey. The journey is as certain as life itself. To make career exploration fun means eliminating all of the things that makes it not fun. We parents are very good at telling. Please don’t tell when it comes to career exploration. Parents are very good at sharing their opinions. Please avoid sharing your opinion until your teenager asks for it. Offer support in whatever way your son or daughter wants that support. Remind yourself often how intimidating an exercise this is for son or daughter. Remind them that you were totally blind about careers, that you had no idea how to go about exploring and choosing a career when you were their age and that you were intimidated by the thought of “choosing a career”. Help them create an environment that puts them in control. Within that general guideline, do not allow your son or daughter to put it off (a natural occurrence when we feel intimidation, fear, and incompetent). With little effort, they can learn a lot during the high school years that will put them way ahead of most college students.

You’ll end up turning your frustration into fun and excitement when you watch your son or daughter talk, act and succeed with passion because they own their career choices. This way they not only find their career choices, but are very excited about it and motivated to go the extra mile to succeed. 


Carl Nielson is the developer of Career Coaching for Students™, the premier career exploration program for high school and college students. Nielson is the founder of Success Discoveries (www.successdiscoveries.com) and The Nielson Group (www.nielsongroup.com), an international corporate organizational management consulting firm. Prior to consulting, he served over 20 years in corporate human resources management. He holds a degree in organizational psychology from Texas A&M University. Find Carl on LinkedIn.   Carl speaks to groups on request and offers parent webinars and seminars for communities. 

If you are looking for true career guidance for a student, check out http://www.careercoachingforstudents.net. Are you past the high school and college years? Check out resources and services at Success Discoveries. Professional career coaching services offered.    

Copyright © 2010 Success Discoveries, LLC
Career Coaching for Students™ is a trademark of Success Discoveries, LLC
Life Skills for Students™ is a trademark of Success Discoveries, LLC

Is it time to revamp career guidance in schools?


As a corporate management and organizational development consultant with over 25 years of hiring, firing, training, coaching and development, I find a mixed population when it comes to people with clear, passionate career direction and those without that clarity and passion. My observations and various academic, corporate and government surveys suggest more people fall into the latter category. Yet those in positions of authority within the secondary and higher education career guidance field seem satisfied with the status quo.Is it time to revamp career guidance in schools?

What has changed over the past 30+ years in career counseling in most schools can be summed up in three letters: WWW. Schools are now offering students an online portal to career information. Most of these programs offer personality assessments that point the student to Holland codes.  So if that is an appropriate assessment for students, how many employers use Holland code type assessments to match people to jobs? My informal scan came up with zero. 

Why revamp career guidance in schools?
I’ve listed some reasons (goals and rewards) that support an effort to revamp career guidance in schools.

  • Higher student self-esteem
  • Higher academic achievement across all student populations
  • Better choices for higher education
  • Shorter time in higher-ed (a change in majors delays a student by at least one semester)
  • Lower student loan debt
  • Higher quality workforce
  • Greater job satisfaction
  • Improved society
  • Higher personal income
  • Higher quality of life
  • and greater employability in a passionate career

Career Guidance redefined.

Career guidance starts with bringing self-awareness to the student. This is minimized by schools, or, if attempted, counselors use personality assessments with relatively low validity and reliability. The typical public school administrator thinks they do not have the budget to consider highly reliable, valid assessments and properly conduct counseling or coaching with each student. As one administrator explained, “we need to leave something for the parents to do”. Colleges and universities are found to have very few resources as well. Many continue to use the Myers Briggs Type Indicator as the tool of choice for expanding students’ self-awareness.   

With solid self-awareness, a valid connection needs to be made to career possibilities. Most students get off the train at this point. They didn’t find the “personality assessments” valid (face validity is critical) and found the career suggestions from the assessment report made no sense. The reality is that making the talent-to-career connection requires the help of a professional career coach or a well-developed career coaching program that guides the student through the process.

From initial investigative research to in-depth career analysis, the ability to research careers has been improved drastically thanks to the Internet. However, left on their own, students find the Internet is a rather large, disorganized information bank that has the potential to get the researcher distracted or totally lost and confused. Students don’t need a Google list of Internet resources or school marketing website disguised as a career guidance site. Internet resources need to be found, evaluated, vetted and categorized in a way that allows the student to stay focused with their research and avoid chasing links to questionable or low-value content.

Career research can’t be defined by Internet resources. At some point, the student must meet people in careers of interest, interview these people, go on job shadowing ventures and get internships working for companies that employ people in his career of interest.  There are several other strategies students can take to learn and identify career choices. Most students don’t complete any of these steps. A very few might do some of this.

Researching ideal careers is half the battle. Today’s students lack skills such as decision-making. Life skills that are learned early support students as they go to college or enter the work world. Life skills are just that, skills learned by experiencing life. However, our culture has changed significantly in the past 30 years. Students do not live in an environment that enables them to develop these life skills the way kids did 50 or 100 years ago. Yet school administrators and parents seem unaware of programs they can use to introduce students to key skills required for success. What are the key skills found in highly successful people? Here is a short list of 18 skills. Which of these aren’t needed to be highly successful? 

  1. Continuous Learning (try this one!)
  2. Personal Accountability
  3. Self Management
  4. Decision Making (Conceptual Thinking, Theoretical Problem Solving, Role Confidence, Balanced Decision Making)
  5. Goal Orientation
  6. Proactive Thinking
  7. Initiative
  8. Project and Goal Focus
  9. Planning and Organizing
  10. Flexibility
  11. Problem Solving
  12. Persistence 
  13. Creativity Innovation
  14. Futuristic Thinking
  15. Influencing Others (Conveying Role Value, Gaining Commitment, Understanding Motivational Needs)
  16. Interpersonal Skills (Evaluating Others, Personal Relationships, Persuading Others)
  17. Written Communication
  18. Personal Drive

What are the chances the typical high school student is being developed in these skill areas? I think it is time to revamp career guidance in schools? Please leave your thoughts in the comment box.

Carl Nielson is the developer of Career Coaching for Students™, the premier career exploration program for high school and college students. Nielson is the founder of Success Discoveries (www.successdiscoveries.com) and The Nielson Group (www.nielsongroup.com), an international corporate organizational management consulting firm. Prior to consulting, he served over 20 years in corporate human resources management. He holds a degree in organizational psychology from Texas A&M University. Find Carl on LinkedIn.   Carl speaks to groups on request and offers parent webinars and seminars for communities.

If you are looking for true career guidance for a student, check out http://www.careercoachingforstudents.net. Are you past the high school and college years? Check out resources and services at Success Discoveries. Professional career coaching services offered.   

Copyright © 2010 Success Discoveries, LLC
Career Coaching for Students™ is a trademark of Success Discoveries, LLC
Life Skills for Students™ is a trademark of Success Discoveries, LLC

Career Talk for Students with Dr. Bruce McLaughlin webinar series starts July 7, 2010: New, Emerging and High Demand Jobs for Students


I am very honored to be Bruce’s first “guest” for Career Talk, a free program for students and parents available by registering at http://tinyurl.com/yk7nfw9.

My topic is New and Emerging Careers for Students. Please forward the info to any parent or student interested in the future (that should cover just about everyone).

Career Talk is a series of free conference calls hosted by Dr. Bruce McLaughlin. Topics cover a wide range of issues important to students and parents of students in high school and college.

Career Talk Series One (July through September 2010)

Format: Interactive conference call (phone) with online screen sharing.
Call in instructions:
1. Call the conference line (one-time register at http://tinyurl.com/yk7nfw9) to connect to the call using your unique PIN
2. At beginning of call go to http;//www.successdiscoveries.glance.net. A session key will be provided at the beginning of the call. Follow the online instructions to connect to the presentation screen.

Interactive Q and A with guest experts will be included on each call.

Wednesday 7/7/10 (7:00 P.M. central) – New and Emerging Careers with Carl Nielson
What careers are going to be in demand in the future? How can you prepare yourself to move into the new job market? This session will address careers and their requirements that are relatively new (non-traditional) or anticipated to be developing over the next ten years. We will discuss the differences between ‘New Occupations’, ‘Emerging Occupations’, and ‘Evolving Occupations’. Carl Nielson is founder of Success Discoveries and the Developer of the Career Coaching for Students program.

Wednesday 7/29/10 (7:00 P.M. central) – College Costs & Funding Strategies Part One
Your family’s security depends upon careful planning for college expenses. A typical education can cost over $100,000 and leave the young student in debt for years. Prepare in advance for one of the most important events of your life. Dr. McLaughlin will be joined by Susan Young, CPA to cover this important topic.

Monday 8/30/10 (6:00 P.M. central) – Know the Score on Standardized Testing
Learn about the role standardized testing plays in the college process and gain simple tips to assist you in preparing for the SAT/ACT.

Monday 9/27/10 (8:00 P.M. central) – College Costs & Funding Strategies Part Two
Your family’s security depends upon careful planning for college expenses. A typical education can cost over $100,000 and leave the young student in debt for years. Prepare in advance for one of the most important events of your life. Dr. McLaughlin will be joined by Susan Young, CPA to discuss and share valuable information.

At the end of each call, Bruce will answer questions and explain some of the specifics about the upcoming St. Louis-area career workshops specifically tailored for students in high school or college.

Bonus: As a Registered Call Participant, we’re providing you access to the Life Skills for Students Continuous Learning module (one of the 16 Life Skills for Students modules included in the workshop).

Bonus #2 for Students: Complimentary “Parent User Manual” assessment. Students are being “assessed” and “tested” constantly. Let’s turn the tables and have the parent take an assessment. Participating parents on the call will be invited to take a complimentary behavioral style assessment. The report will be enlightening for the parent and the entire family. Instructions will be e-mailed after the call.

To learn more about upcoming workshops http://www.careercoachingforstudents.net/career-coaching-for-students-events/30-st-louis-student-career-workshop.html

Career Coaching for Students workshop is highly recommended for high school students:

Incoming Freshmen
Sophomores
Juniors*
Seniors*

*This workshop is critical for Juniors and Seniors if they are making college and major choices without a clear career plan., Talent Development: Hire,Train & Retain the Best. Executive Coaching, Team Development, Student Career CoachingTriMetrix, CPVA, CPBABy Carl Nielson,

Adora Svitak: What Adults Can Learn from Kids


Adora Svitak is a young teenager (teen, tween?). To watch her give a speech to a TED audience gives any parent a moment of wonderment. In her speech she talks about what kids bring to the world and how adults can learn a few things that, perhaps, we’ve forgotten. It is a great speech, great presentation, very polished. Well done Adora!

Now for the most interesting part. Read the comments that are coming in (watch the video at the link above first, the comments are listed below the video). If you are an adult, teacher or parent, some of the comments are extremely positive, perhaps even helpful toward Adora’s points, others not so much, even making Adora’s points even more valid. For example, Dani wrote “Adora, thank you. I’m an educator and as the school year nears it’s end you have reminded me to trust my students, to allow them to express themselves and to provide them with an environment where they can thrive.”  A very positive statement. Very helpful in reminding us that children are “diamonds in the rough” and that, if given the opportunity, children can be brilliant. Of course the key here is “given the opportunity”.

Most kids do not grow up in a perfect environment (home, school, social). This imperfection in the environment takes its toll on the “self view” of “potential” that each person has as they grow. For most, once the self view is tarnished, motivation decreases. A negative bias on one’s self view does not have to be cause for decreased individual motivation.

Based on data coming from an extremely valid and reliable assessment, a negative bias for self view is found in 85% of the population. It turns out that a negative bias for self view is what gives most of us a “continuous learning” attitude. Otherwise, we become so egotistical in our own abilities that we would be intolerable in relationships (personal, work, etc.). So a negative bias for self view is important to understand and put to use.

Many students develop the negative self bias and fail to see themselves as worthwhile, deserving of a great future and “high potential”. Some teachers, with their own imperfect self, make the situation worse. We see these students in high school acting out in many different ways but they all seem to have one common theme – under achievement academically and a preference to play to an extreme that results in avoidance of intellectual development).  

Now fast-forward to high school. I recall having “moments” of brilliance but not getting much recognition. Those moments of brilliance were camouflaged with an abundance of mediocrity. Knowing what I now know, mediocrity is the air that everyone breaths. There are two components or “ingredients” that, when added to our air, change things dramatically. The first is something called life skills. The second is career exploration.

These two components, specific life skills and clear career match to talents, were consistently found in highly successful people. To see what life skills were identified in highly successful people go here. To see what a real student career coaching program looks like go here.

So, based on the 12 key life skills identified in highly successful people, which of those does Adora display as she takes her audience on the journey to “learn from kids”?

School Principal – Most Hated Profession?


The website About.com has a post to ask the question “why is school principal one of the most hated professions”? Is the school principal really hated? As the about.com article suggests, the school principal is like the CEO of the school. If a school principal did their job in a very respectable manner (highly effective communicator, consistently making good decisions, setting clear strategies and goals, supporting all stakeholders effectively) would they really be hated? Experience and research  in the work world suggests that someone in a job that can be “disliked for what it is” can actually change the perception, and in fact, not be hated. It is based on the person’s talents and how well they match to the job’s requirements.Teacher to School Principal - Should I or Should I Not?

The position of School Principal is ususally obtained through the teaching path. So which teachers make good Principals? Is it possible that there are some teachers that are not cut out to be teachers but could be great school principals? The two jobs are so different that it is very likely that a mediocre teacher can make a great school principal. However, there are certain personal leadership qualities that a teacher must have that will serve a person in the principal’s role. Without those, the person would fail in the principal’s role.

If you are a teacher or Principal of a school and want to assess your personal talent skills (no cost) please complete the information request form on our home page.  You may also e-mail directly to Carl Nielson, Chief Discovery Officer, Success Discoveries. For the subject line, please reference: Personal Talent Skills for School Principal, skill assessment request.

Frontline Exposes Fraudulent Student Enrollment Practices


Frontline College Inc. Exposes Fraudulent PracticesThe award-winning PBS series Frontline has produced a program called College, Inc. that exposes the promises made and recruiting tactics used by for-profit schools to enroll students. If you, or your son/daughter, are being pressured by for-profit schools we recommend you watch the video. The program exposes extensive fraud associated with “career counseling”. There are employees with job titles that imply career counseling is what they do. These are sales people that have one objective – to sign up as many students as possible.

The issue has become so large that the U. S. Department of Education has become involved. Federal aid to for-profit colleges has become an issue as it has jumped to $26.5 billion in 2009 from $4.6 billion in 2000, according to the Education Department, prompting concern that these students are taking on too much debt (see Bloomberg Businessweek “Obama Plans New Rules as For-Profit Colleges Mobilize“). If the earning potential of graduates were high enough to pay back the loans within a reasonable time period, the issue wouldn’t be nearly as significant. However, these for-profit programs are not delivering on promises they make to students. They will say anything to enroll a student.

If you are looking for true career coaching for students, look at http://www.careercoachingforstudents.net. Are you past the high school and college years? Check out free resources at Success Discoveries. Professional career coaching services offered. See what a real career coach looks like.

What Will You Be Doing 7 Years From Now?


This is a special article written by Augie Mendoza and re-posted from Bob Proctor’s Insight of the Day. This story connects to graduating high school students of today. As you will read, Augie graduated from high school in 1972. Read the story to get some insight into how career planning was addressed “back in the day”.


by Augie Mendoz,
I graduated from Brazosport High School in Freeport, Texas in May 1972. Not dressed in white (honors), but I graduated.

That summer like the previous summer, I worked as a longshoreman loading corn, flour and corn sacks weighing 50 to 140 lbs. and 900 lbs. caustic soda drums on freight ships bound to other countries at nearby Brazos Harbor and Dow Chemical A2 Dock.

This was one of the better paying jobs in the area. It was grueling, hard, heavy work, but I loved it at the time. My father had been doing this job most of his life since it paid well.

Fall came around and I had already decided that I did not want to make my living as a longshoreman. Work was inconsistent and when it was there it only went to the ones with the most seniority, unless there was too much. There was very little opportunity for a better job when you got older.

I had always heard that a college education would get you a better job and decided to find out. So I went to nearby Brazosport College and set up an appointment with a counselor.

I got to his office at the appointed time and he asked me what work or profession interested me the most. I had taken Auto Mechanics I & II during my junior and senior years in high school and asked him if Brazosport College had an auto mechanics program.

He said “no.” I asked him if they had anything similar to it. He said that the Machine Tools Technology program was very similar and described the program to me.

I was very interested and asked him how long it would take if I went full time. He said “4 years.” I said I couldn’t go full time since I am working (whenever work was available).

I asked how long would it take if I go part time? He said “7 years.” I was shocked. I said, “Man, I’ll be old then, I’ll be 25 years old. I don’t thing so.”

He asked me, “what did you say you did for a living right now?”

I told him again that I worked as a longshoreman throwing bags and manhandling drums. Then he bent over his desk and looked me square in the eye and asked me the most significant words I will never forget in my life:

“IF YOU DON’T TAKE ANY CLASSES. WHAT WILL YOU BE DOING 7 YEARS FROM NOW?”

These words hit me like a ton of bricks! I sheepishly told him that I would be doing the same thing. I signed up for the classes right then and there.

These prophetic words have inspired many of my relatives and friends. The sun will rise and fall 365 days a year. What you choose to do in between will determine many things in your life.

This story alone has inspired relatives and friends to realize an age-old truth: Time will go on regardless and it waits on nobody.

Years later, I told a co-worker this story. He got inspired enough that he went on and got 3 different degrees in computers in less than 7 years! He said afterwards, “7 years ago I would’ve been saying to myself, ‘If only I had the opportunity.'”

TIME WILL PASS REGARDLESS!
Augie Mendoza


My impression is that there are millions of Augies graduating this year – in 2010. Yes, some kind of career planning efforts are going on in high school. Yes, career interest assessments are being offered. Yes, the Internet has opened an entire world of opportunity to all students. Do college admissions counselors care today, yes, very much. Based on job satisfaction surveys, people are very effectively getting college degrees and going into “jobs” but too few are finding their passion. Finding your passion and immersing in that passion is like getting a 50 point boost in your IQ. Are you engaged in your own career planning?

So how is today’s career planning different than it was “back in the day”?
Let’s put it this way. If you are wanting to learn how to cook would you go to your local certified mechanic or would you look for a culinary class. Receiving career counseling from teachers and counselors in high school is certainly a good start. Receiving educational advice from a college placement office is also good to do. But if you want to seriously explore careers and create the plan that positions you for success, wouldn’t it be best to utilize a career coach who has extensive knowledge and experience “outside the academic world”? Career Coaching for Students™ is delivered by professional career coaches that have a passion for helping students and the right expertise to help you to create a strategic career path that leverages your passions. The program’s internet resources save considerable time finding the information that is most useful for you. To see what a career coach looks like, check out the Career Coaching for Students™ Career Coaches Profiles.

What is the Primary Reason Students Don’t Receive Career Coaching?


Getting a college education has been the #1 advice from school counselors and parents. “Go to school, get a good education, and get a good job” has been the advice for many generations. But what does this mean for the high school student?Student Career Coaching? What a Concept!

Career counseling is offered in most high schools today, but actual career coaching (more often referred to as career planning) is virtually nonexistent. Students go to college and obtain degrees only to discover that they have climbed the wrong mountain. After all those years of work, they find that they are either unhappy with their career choice or can´t get a job in the career area they’ve selected. Many graduate from college without really knowing what they want to do with the degree that they have earned.

Unfortunately, many of those students will go on to climb another mountain by getting another degree, only to find that yet again they can´t find a job in their chosen field or they don´t much care for the career options they have selected. Many people have multiple college degrees they have obtained through a trial and error process. Some of these students may be attracted to the learning environment and have chosen to hide out in the academic world until they find the right career. Instead of spending time up front researching and planning, they just begin climbing the mountain and figure they´ll make their plan once they get to the top. But there is nothing there.

Today´s educational planning is akin to building a house without any purpose and design in mind (and obviously without an architectural rendering of the house plans). Sure you can look at magazines and online resources to get some ideas about what the features of the house might be. Can you imagine the look on the delivery guys face when he shows up with a truck load of concrete and asks where to pour it only to be told you’re not sure but maybe pour a little over here, a little over there and some back here? Likewise, many students spend time planning what college they are going to go to, how they are going to pay for it, and even what they are going to study, without actually planning what they will do with the degree once they get it.

As a management consultant specializing in organizational development and hiring, I can say with confidence this is all too common in today´s society. Employers are baffled at the lack of clarity around career direction shown by graduating college students. Having a “I’ll take any job I can get” strategy for job search after college is a strategy but it won’t generate the desired results.

So what is the answer? A more in-depth career coaching class for high school students would be a way to introduce the topic and the importance of making a plan and begin the journey with confidence. Offering career coaching at the college level would allow students to follow through with the actual planning process that was started in high school. Both high schools and colleges have done a good job of presenting an image of providing career coaching. Very few are really doing it.

It is essential that young people learn the value of career coaching and actually plan their careers before deciding on education. And it wouldn’t hurt to throw in a little bit of life skills development that will give the student a leg up when they actually arrive at college or in their first job or summer internship.

Of course, no plan is set in stone and gets implemented as is. This is the main reason so many people don’t spend time planning. But when it comes to career and college, not planning is a very expensive strategy. Any career plans can be modified throughout the journey and should be modified to fit a person’s evolving interests and knowledge (I refer to this as focusing). Introducing career exploration and coaching at the Freshman level in high school has significant potential of impacting the student’s academic performance throughout high school and into college. But most importantly, career coaching reduces the likelihood of students climbing many wrong mountains and significantly increases the likelihood of finding the right path without getting lost in the forest.

There is a perception that true career coaching that results in making great personal choices and following through to see positive results isn’t possible. There used to be a perception that a person’s success couldn’t be predicted. Today, employers are using highly sophisticated yet simple talent assessments to determine “job fit” of applicants. This same science is being used by only one career planning program: Career Coaching for Students™.

To readers: What is the primary reason high school students don’t receive career coaching?

Abusive Teaching or Inspiring Leadership


An article posted by Harvard Business Review and written by Gill Corkindale addresses Gordon Brown’s leadership style. The title of the article is Gordon Brown’s Leadership, Passionate or Bullying?

For the average student in U.S. high schools, Gordon Brown may be known only as a political figure. He is Britain’s Prime Minister. However, he represents something that is found in almost every organization, including schools and some family structures.

In the article, Ms. Corkindale states “For many of us, there is a disturbing familiarity about these reports [of bullying behavior], which stir up memories of our own bullying bosses, teachers and colleagues. Unfortunately it is all too easy to visualize the disturbing picture of Mr. Brown as a leader prone to “volcanic eruptions of bad behavior,” outbursts of anger, black moods, permanent states of rage, and a boiling temper. And some of us will recognise the panic and mayhem in his office from our own experience, with stressed staff running around, lashing out at each other, and an inner circle divided and in flux.”

She raises the question: Do  the best leaders have some bullying tendencies?

Ms. Corkindale states the obvious when she says that bullying is unacceptable. Bullies are frightening, destructive and a drain on resources, time and energy. “I well recall the boss who had to be appeased constantly, whose moods changed like the weather, who regularly put staff under the spotlight or dressed them down in public, and who believed that all problems were caused by the incompetence of others. Such “leaders” demean people, lower morale, and create cultures of fear. Sadly, I have coached too many people who have had to work for such people over the years.”

In Mr. Brown’s case, elections can remove him from the privilege of leadership. In the case of teachers and school administrators, contracts may not be renewed. In the case of managers in an organization, I’ve seen many abusive managers be tolerated by upper management because they may generate short term results. I’ve also seen those same organizations fail.

Everyone is under pressure and occasionally events conspire to make us lose our temper. But that is different than creating a culture of fear, allowing emotions to consistently overcome us and disrespecting others. Then it becomes an abuse of power — and the leader remains one in name only.

For you students who have either seen abusive behavior in school or have yet to see it, it will happen – unfortunately. If the behavior is negatively effecting you, I strongly urge you to ask the person for a “closed door” meeting. In that meeting, tell the abusive person what they are doing and how it is effecting you. Tell them that you want to grow and learn but that you will not accept abusive treatment. Explain to them that the next time they treat you disrespectfully you will take it further. Do this with confidence. I promise you it will work to improve your situation and it will help that person be a better leader. If it doesn’t, the person will have created their own demise and will be removed from the organization.

Leadership is a privilege. Abuse of the privilege should always be dealt with directly and timely. Executive coaching is an effective tool for those that have potential and show a sincere desire for personal growth. Teachers and administrators are no different from executives and managers in an organization. Leadership inspires greatness in others. There is no evidence that a bully leader is effective at creating greatness in others or has created sustained success for an organization. A bully leader is effective at creating low self-esteem in others. Many times this is due to a need to boost their own self-esteem.

If you are a parent or a school board member who hears repeated stories of bully leadership, meet with that person one-on-one. Give them feedback that you are aware of the bad behavior and that it isn’t something you will accept going forward. On the flip side, students and parents need to be careful not to punish a good teacher that has standards of excellence and gives students a low grade for mediocrity. A great teacher knows what a student is capable of and has many approaches to inspire greatness in the student. Giving a low grade to someone who is putting half-effort into their work is extremely important. Giving a high grade for mediocre work because of fear of parental retaliation is the worst thing that can happen to the student. They will suffer, possibly for the rest of their life.

Inspiring greatness includes holding and demanding high standards. Allowing a student, parent or an employee to manipulate a leader’s right to demand greatness is just as wrong as a bullying leader. There is no room for either. A truly great leader inspires everyone from students or employees to parents and stakeholders.